Manitoba firefighter not authorized to drive ambulance involved in collision

User avatar
tmehmel
Posts: 328
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:33 pm

Postby tmehmel » Tue Dec 23, 2008 9:25 am

Ok, to clarify things I want to correct a couple of details. The FF that drove the Ambulance was on the Fire apparatus not assigned to EMS. The weather and road conditions were such that another EMS unit would have been 40 minutes away. Now that being said, and given that the patient needs more advanced care than the paramedics can offer, what would you do as IC? While all the arguments can be seen as valid, what about just doing the job within your training to help the patient?? You can study stuff to death and review past incidents until the cows come home but the bottom line is that as IC, you have to make the best decision you can to mitigate the incident.

Tom

AxeInHand
Posts: 156
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:33 pm

I Hear Ya

Postby AxeInHand » Tue Dec 23, 2008 6:14 pm

"and given that the patient needs more advanced care than the paramedics can offer, what would you do as IC? While all the arguments can be seen as valid, what about just doing the job within your training to help the patient?? "

I think that says two very important things:

1) We need to make sure that patients that need more attention than medics can give get to the hospital, and
2) We do our job within our training.

I am not trained to drive an ambulance, so short of a direct order from a superior, I wouldn't.

I guess that would be EMS's call (I am quite sure ours would not ask us), and an officer's call whether or not to go ahead. I am all for helping people as much as I can; I love it, and I think it is critical to both the personal and public identity of firefighters.

Unfortuntely some people have abused the system, and I really don't feel like having my life thrown around in a liability lawsuit for helping someone outside my training. I know years ago we were in a similar situation, and they took the risk and it payed off, but many things have changed since then (both the EMS system and the public we serve).

I guess at the end of the day you have to decide just how far you are willing to go for a patient that might turn around and sue you for going the extra mile in the first place. It's messed up, but that is reality.
All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing. - Edmund Burke

Nagrom
Posts: 401
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:33 pm

Postby Nagrom » Wed Dec 24, 2008 9:39 am

On the note of helping someone coming back to bite you, last time I took first aid (I've got First responder now, so cool) the woman teaching it said if you're ever in the states and see an accident, do not stop to help. It must be pretty bad down there if that ever needs to be said.

northernmedic
Posts: 208
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:33 pm

Postby northernmedic » Wed Dec 24, 2008 3:28 pm

There was a case recently where a good samaritan was sued in California. I'll try and trach down the story and post a link.

User avatar
nocomment
Posts: 736
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:33 pm

Postby nocomment » Wed Dec 24, 2008 4:07 pm

"northernmedic" wrote:There was a case recently where a good samaritan was sued in California. I'll try and trach down the story and post a link.


This one?

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081218/ap_on_re_us/samaritan_protection

northernmedic
Posts: 208
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:33 pm

Postby northernmedic » Wed Dec 24, 2008 4:39 pm

Yes that's it.

User avatar
kilometras
Posts: 102
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:33 pm

Postby kilometras » Wed Dec 24, 2008 7:31 pm

i guess the biggest thing about rural ems response is that you normally respond with 2 medics. dependant on the service it usually boils down to first ems on scene to establish a triage scenario. ie more medics etc. this can be complicated due to geographics in a say situation say where you have a single pt. this immediately diffuses the need for more units...but the pt is a red..now you have to decide do i want to wait for another unit 20 miles away or do i possibly utilize a firefighter.. in my area i am fortunate as i have access to ems trained firefighters as there are several of us that do both. i appreciate the concern as i am normally in the back and experience behind the wheel is definetely a very good idea.. end result i think the us and them thing should be left to the areas where manpower is an ambundance.. education in the rurals between the two services would bode better.

Nagrom
Posts: 401
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:33 pm

Postby Nagrom » Sat Dec 27, 2008 2:25 pm

"LOS ANGELES – Proving that no good deed goes unpunished, the state's high court on Thursday said a would-be Good Samaritan accused of rendering her friend paraplegic by pulling her from a wrecked car "like a rag doll" can be sued."

Some friend, eh?

I think that preplanning and education is important, as well as getting to know the people you work with on calls. I haven't followed the whole thread, but, perhaps this sort of thing should be discussed before the need, and could have prevented some friction.

My opinion: Paramedics spend rediculous amounts of time driving an ambulance, and If I'm ever in the back, I'd rather have a FF and a medic in the back, with a highly experienced medic driving.

unglunk
Posts: 100
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:33 pm

class 4 in SK

Postby unglunk » Wed Dec 31, 2008 10:39 am

I have had numerous police officers and firefighters drive my Ambulance over the years when i have needed my partner in the back with me, and it has never been an issue; i do try to have someone with a class 4 drive though. I think legally, this would cover my end, but now i'm not so sure. The Ambulance act anywhere always seems to be some archaic out of touch piece of literature with a lot of unrealistic expectations.


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests