PTSD and Sleeping

We all know anyone involved in the firefighting and rescue community is no stranger to stress...
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Scratch
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PTSD and Sleeping

Postby Scratch » Sun Jan 24, 2010 6:08 pm

Well, not sure how this will turn out.

Apparently I am suffering from PTSD, while I sleep. I will admit that I have seen my fair share of "stuff". I know that I don't have to tell you what that stuff is. Well basicly what I have been told by my ex and now my present lady friend I am with is that I jump and scream in my sleep. I was told that I will do any thing from freak out to tell you not to hurt me. Also at my previous job when we were traveling some one would tap me and I would go into a defensive postuere with fist raised. I have not struck any one as of yet.

I am just worried that if I am with some one that it will happen at home. I do have vague recolections of stuff like this happening but alot of times its told to me in the morning. I am honestly affraid to hurt some one. Has any one had anything like this happen to them. How did deal with this? Any suggestions that you can pass me would be great. If you have any questions feel free to ask and I will speak.
If your scratching my back then who's leading the way?


All men are created equal, then a few become firemen. ~Author Unknown

infernobuster
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Postby infernobuster » Sun Jan 24, 2010 9:19 pm

Im assuming your on the job somewhere full time ..

Your city/town should have in place an Employee Assistance program. I would contact them and see someone for PTSD, and explain to them some of the issues.
Also if your city/town is big enough they may also have their own Critical Incident Team.

You can talk to one of them, and they would assist you getting the help you need.

If NONE of those are an option, id suggest seeing your doctor as he will be able to point you in the right direction.
All men are created equal, a few become fire fighters.

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Scratch
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Postby Scratch » Sun Jan 24, 2010 9:23 pm

[quote=""infernobuster""]Im assuming your on the job somewhere full time ..

Your city/town should have in place an Employee Assistance program. I would contact them and see someone for PTSD, and explain to them some of the issues.
Also if your city/town is big enough they may also have their own Critical Incident Team.

You can talk to one of them, and they would assist you getting the help you need.

If NONE of those are an option, id suggest seeing your doctor as he will be able to point you in the right direction.[/quote]


I am a volounteer. I dont feel comftorble talking to my people. My doctor said that I should call mental health and talk to a phycatrist. I don't think I should.
If your scratching my back then who's leading the way?


All men are created equal, then a few become firemen. ~Author Unknown

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dentedhead
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Postby dentedhead » Sun Jan 24, 2010 10:32 pm

[quote=""Scratch""]I am a volounteer. I dont feel comftorble talking to my people. My doctor said that I should call mental health and talk to a phycatrist. I don't think I should.[/quote]

Why? Do you have a degree in a mental health discipline? Have you been Dx with PTSD or is it night terrors.Two totally unrelated disorders,PTSD isnt Dx in one visit with a GP.

If you go through an EAP program it is totally confidential and you dont talk to your "people".

You dont need to see a psychiatrist.You need a counsellor or a psychologist.PTSD in its purest form is not treatable with Rx,if it is complicated with another mental illness they are treated totally seperate.

Someone very close too me has got a severe case of it,severe enough they are considered to be disabled.

Dentedhead
Last edited by dentedhead on Sun Jan 24, 2010 10:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Thousand a week for hide and seek on call when Im paid to be.

WolfmanHarris
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Postby WolfmanHarris » Sun Jan 24, 2010 10:46 pm

[quote=""Scratch""]I don't think I should.[/quote]

It's important to try to destigmatize mental health issues within yourself. Just like you'd make sure you'd see an MD and a Physiotherapist, this is a workplace injury that needs professional attention. When your mind works against you it's unlike any other part of your body. Unlike a knee or an arm, you can't look at it dispassionately or separate from yourself. I can't tell you how to overcome your hang-ups over seeking help as it's an individual process and it's hard. But it's a job, (and in the case of volunteering, not a particularly well paying one) not your whole life and something like this can take over.

You're not alone though. Maybe seek out someone you trust who's been there, find out who they used and trusted and start there.

If there's not someone you'd be willing to approach or you want to go outside your circle I'd suggest either seeking some resources from Veteran's Affairs Canada (who have experience dealing with these issues and might provide some direction) or contact the Tema Conter Memorial Trust at http://www.tema.ca. They specialize in research and resources for PTSD and CIS in Emergency Services and may also provide help.

Just like a cancer, when a mental illness is left to fester it will only get worse. It won't go away.

Good luck!

Knockdown
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Your not alone

Postby Knockdown » Sat Jan 30, 2010 2:20 pm

Hello Scratch,
My wife also tells me about this happening. I haven't sought any professional assistance yet. I've been in the service for twenty years now. My take on it is that we are responding to the need. So long as we know we did all we could, the outcome of these incidents could not have been changed. A debrief within your crew should reinforce acceptance of that fact.

I am more conscious of sharing my safety knowledge with family and friends. Things like checking smoke and CO detectors. Having proper tires on your car, that sort of thing. At least its something proactive instead of all the reactive things we deal with.

I always wake well rested and ready to go, hope it works out well for you.

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Scratch
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Postby Scratch » Sun Jan 31, 2010 4:33 pm

[quote=""Knockdown""]Hello Scratch,
My wife also tells me about this happening. I haven't sought any professional assistance yet. I've been in the service for twenty years now. My take on it is that we are responding to the need. So long as we know we did all we could, the outcome of these incidents could not have been changed. A debrief within your crew should reinforce acceptance of that fact.

I am more conscious of sharing my safety knowledge with family and friends. Things like checking smoke and CO detectors. Having proper tires on your car, that sort of thing. At least its something proactive instead of all the reactive things we deal with.

I always wake well rested and ready to go, hope it works out well for you.[/quote]


I do talk to very close friends and select family about things.
If your scratching my back then who's leading the way?


All men are created equal, then a few become firemen. ~Author Unknown

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nocomment
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Postby nocomment » Mon Feb 01, 2010 2:03 am

Simple. GO TALK TO SOMEONE!!! Its bigger than you bro trust me......

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HalifaxHooligan
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Postby HalifaxHooligan » Thu Feb 04, 2010 9:39 am

[quote=""Scratch""]I am honestly affraid to hurt some one.[/quote]

If you are afraid now, think about what happens if this escalates.

From the sounds of it, you're experiencing stress from a number of events that have accumulated over the years. This is common and you aren't alone. Others have experienced the same thing over the years.

Seeking help is NOT a sign of weakness. Recognizing that you have a problem that requires help beyond your own ability, is a sign of strength.

Remember, firefighting isn't about bravado any more. In fact, most (not all unfortunately) departments strongly discourage it.

If you don't want to go through your volunteer department's EAP, then you may want to check with your employer to see if one exists through there or get a referral from your family doctor.

You owe it to yourself to have your mind at ease.

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Mike_Oxhuge
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Postby Mike_Oxhuge » Thu Feb 11, 2010 12:26 am

[quote=""Scratch""]Well, not sure how this will turn out.

Apparently I am suffering from PTSD, while I sleep. I will admit that I have seen my fair share of "stuff". I know that I don't have to tell you what that stuff is. Well basicly what I have been told by my ex and now my present lady friend I am with is that I jump and scream in my sleep. I was told that I will do any thing from freak out to tell you not to hurt me. Also at my previous job when we were traveling some one would tap me and I would go into a defensive postuere with fist raised. I have not struck any one as of yet.

I am just worried that if I am with some one that it will happen at home. I do have vague recolections of stuff like this happening but alot of times its told to me in the morning. I am honestly affraid to hurt some one. Has any one had anything like this happen to them. How did deal with this? Any suggestions that you can pass me would be great. If you have any questions feel free to ask and I will speak.[/quote]

I feel your pain and the only way to deal with your demons is to talk to someone, get it all out. I had to leave my industrial fire job after 11 years because I was bipolar and pretty much a raging maniac alcoholic. I beat up fellow firefighters, had sex with various women while at work, stole, lied, didn't show up for work, sometimes showed up high or drunk, and all because of one call that started it all. I was a danger to my fellow workers and people I served, I am not a small man and when I would lose my mind it was not pretty. I eventually was forced into a rehab program and it was determined that I was not suited for this job anymore because of my mental issues. I am not proud of what i did, and I thank God everyday for getting help because i would probably be in jail right now if I didn't. You need to get help, someone will always be willing to listen, I took the hard way out of the fire service, you don't want to do that, I will live with shame for the rest of my life. Your story is different from mine but it follows the same path in the end, get off that path right now, get help. Michael Osshue.
"I'm on the Zoloft to keep me from killing y'all"


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