Various HSE Integrated Firefighter Positions


wnameth
Posts: 84
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:33 pm

Postby wnameth » Mon Mar 28, 2016 3:19 pm

[quote=""Firefly09""]Hey everyone,

Here are a couple Industrial firefighting positions for those who are interested:
[/quote]


Anyone have any idea about shift schedule, salary benefits for a position with HSE? Employee reviews don't look very promising about the overall experience but I can't find any specific info for the position of industrial FF.

Thanks

Scoot
Posts: 83
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:33 pm

Postby Scoot » Tue Mar 29, 2016 9:40 am

[quote=""wnameth""]Anyone have any idea about shift schedule, salary benefits for a position with HSE? Employee reviews don't look very promising about the overall experience but I can't find any specific info for the position of industrial FF.

Thanks[/quote]

I use to work for them as an industrial firefighter so I'll try and answer your questions to give you a general idea of what its all about.

Shift Schedule - Usually it's 12hr shifts sometimes longer with quick turnarounds (might get as little as 4hrs sleep between jobs). You don't USUALLY get a job longer than 2-3 days before you move on to the next one if one exists.

Salary - I was at $18/hr with OT after 8hrs worked.

Overall - If you don't mind "working" 12hrs a day and have an endless supply of movies than you'll be alright. As an Industrial Firefighter be prepared to do anything but, I ended up working as a safety watch, air hand, CSE watch, fire watch, hot shot driver, equipment tech and shop hand.

Training is minimal, just enough to get your oilfield tickets (PSTS, CST, H2S etc) then you're pretty much on your own. You get told where you're going but no directions on how to get there (if your unfamiliar with the area) When I first started as a air hand I had 20mins "training" on how the trailer works then I was on my own. Granted most people can figure it out but it was intimidating having 4 people on air in a sour gas situation.

As an Industrial Firefighter you work in a team of 2. The day consists of driving to site, parking the truck, "rig in" (setup hoses and SCBA's), participate in the safety meeting, sit in the truck for the remaining 11.5hrs then "rig out" (pack everything up) and go home. I found it extremely boring and I didn't learn anything so I decided it wasn't for me.

Hope that helps, any questions feel free to ask.

Pondduck
Posts: 202
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:33 pm

Postby Pondduck » Tue Mar 29, 2016 9:53 am

scoot: that is exactly my experience. aside from several emergencies that happened on site, the sitting in the truck is a bit of a killer.

wnameth
Posts: 84
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:33 pm

Postby wnameth » Tue Mar 29, 2016 5:30 pm

[quote=""Scoot""]I use to work for them as an industrial firefighter so I'll try and answer your questions to give you a general idea of what its all about.

Shift Schedule - Usually it's 12hr shifts sometimes longer with quick turnarounds (might get as little as 4hrs sleep between jobs). You don't USUALLY get a job longer than 2-3 days before you move on to the next one if one exists.

Salary - I was at $18/hr with OT after 8hrs worked.

Overall - If you don't mind "working" 12hrs a day and have an endless supply of movies than you'll be alright. As an Industrial Firefighter be prepared to do anything but, I ended up working as a safety watch, air hand, CSE watch, fire watch, hot shot driver, equipment tech and shop hand.

Training is minimal, just enough to get your oilfield tickets (PSTS, CST, H2S etc) then you're pretty much on your own. You get told where you're going but no directions on how to get there (if your unfamiliar with the area) When I first started as a air hand I had 20mins "training" on how the trailer works then I was on my own. Granted most people can figure it out but it was intimidating having 4 people on air in a sour gas situation.

As an Industrial Firefighter you work in a team of 2. The day consists of driving to site, parking the truck, "rig in" (setup hoses and SCBA's), participate in the safety meeting, sit in the truck for the remaining 11.5hrs then "rig out" (pack everything up) and go home. I found it extremely boring and I didn't learn anything so I decided it wasn't for me.

Hope that helps, any questions feel free to ask.[/quote]

Thanks for the info. I'll be staying away from this one haha. Cut my wage in half to sit in a truck with zero added training. No thanks !

shantzy88
Posts: 76
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:33 pm

Postby shantzy88 » Tue Mar 29, 2016 6:53 pm

Is this the same for the Sarnia one?? Or is Sarnia more for the refineries? I was an industrial ff for bravo oilfield safety services in Saskatchewan and it was the same bs you guys are talking about with hse. Just wondering if it would be any different in Sarnia being as there is no oil patch, just chemical Valley. Cheers
"I've got your back when your back's against the wall, you mess with one, you've got us all."

Spoodermun
Posts: 21
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:33 pm

Postby Spoodermun » Tue Mar 29, 2016 9:25 pm

I haven't personally worked for HSE, however I do work as a firefighter/emt for a fire department on a plant site in Fort Mac. I've seen the guys from HSE doing everything from air testing, to CSE as stated, to sitting in a rig, setting up showers etc. Far from being a firefighter in any aspect.

If Industrial Firefighting is the route you want to go, get your EMT (PCP), some tech rescue courses and try for one of the bigger companies like Suncor, Nexen, CNRL etc.

If your just in it because you need a job, and don't mind working plenty of days on for a low wage - then HSE might be for you. But make sure you have movies ready!! Haha.

Spoodermun
Posts: 21
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:33 pm

Postby Spoodermun » Tue Mar 29, 2016 9:26 pm

And yes Shantzy, I can't imagine their role would be any different then standby in Sarnia. Especially as they have their on municipal department close enough for response.

probemyfirehole
Posts: 32
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:33 pm

Postby probemyfirehole » Wed Mar 30, 2016 5:44 am

[quote=""shantzy88""]Is this the same for the Sarnia one?? Or is Sarnia more for the refineries? I was an industrial ff for bravo oilfield safety services in Saskatchewan and it was the same bs you guys are talking about with hse. Just wondering if it would be any different in Sarnia being as there is no oil patch, just chemical Valley. Cheers[/quote]

Sarnia is the same as the oil patch. There is a refinery there, as well as gas plants and chemical valley. Responsibilities are the same. There are plant fire departments, but HSE guys are first call rescue for any confined space. So its a big responsibility if anything goes wrong.

Scoot
Posts: 83
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:33 pm

Postby Scoot » Mon Apr 04, 2016 7:34 pm

[quote=""Pondduck""]scoot: that is exactly my experience. aside from several emergencies that happened on site, the sitting in the truck is a bit of a killer.[/quote]

True, you get the odd emergency but in all honesty its usually someone who gets splashed and needs a hosing down.

[quote=""wnameth""]Thanks for the info. I'll be staying away from this one haha. Cut my wage in half to sit in a truck with zero added training. No thanks ![/quote]

There is added training but IMO it doesn't help you any with municipal fire, nothing is NFPA so there's no point. Again that's only my opinion.

[quote=""Spoodermun""]I haven't personally worked for HSE, however I do work as a firefighter/emt for a fire department on a plant site in Fort Mac. I've seen the guys from HSE doing everything from air testing, to CSE as stated, to sitting in a rig, setting up showers etc. Far from being a firefighter in any aspect.

If Industrial Firefighting is the route you want to go, get your EMT (PCP), some tech rescue courses and try for one of the bigger companies like Suncor, Nexen, CNRL etc.

If your just in it because you need a job, and don't mind working plenty of days on for a low wage - then HSE might be for you. But make sure you have movies ready!! Haha.[/quote]

Couldn't agree more, I highly recommend this. Aim for the oil company itself, not a sub contractor (i.e HSE, Target etc) at least that way you'll be doing what you are hired to do.


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