Wildland Boots?

dross60
Posts: 10
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:33 pm

Wildland Boots?

Postby dross60 » Thu Aug 14, 2014 2:22 am

What do you guys recommend for boots? I see lots of guys with those expensive boots from Viberg, White's, Wesco... but they are so bulky and heavy! Any other recommendations?? There's gotta be some fireboots out there that don't have that ridiculous 1.5" vibram heel like on the ones I mentioned. Also with an all leather lining no goretex.

dross60
Posts: 10
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:33 pm

Postby dross60 » Fri Aug 15, 2014 2:05 am

Just stumbled upon Hoffman's Smokechasers http://www.hoffmanboots.com/ProductInfo ... ductid=8SC

Any one have experience with these?

dross60
Posts: 10
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:33 pm

Postby dross60 » Fri Sep 26, 2014 2:23 am

No replies? Well it looks like everyone is having a busy season then ( I know I have!). I'm gonna go ahead and buy these next season so I will report back by May ;)

bcFRST
Posts: 33
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:33 pm

Postby bcFRST » Tue Sep 30, 2014 10:49 am

Heya,

Your boots should reflect the work you are doing and your specific topography. Are you going to be hanging out in an Ontarible swamp all summer or on the side of a mountain in BC? (where you could also be hanging out in a swamp all summer).

A logger-style lug-sole (ie, the "Smokejumper" model in pretty much any brand) is going to be the best for durability and will hold up on hot ground. That being said, a light low-heel hiker/hunter might be better if you're in shield country or the skeg.

A lot of folks I work with favour the trekking-style boot (Scarpa Fuego/ La Sportiva Glacier WFX) as they offer greater ankle support, a heel lift (I know you weren't keen on the raised heel but once you get used to it, it'll make your life much more enjoyable) and hold up decently. Downsides are they are warmer than a straight leather upper (ie, Viberg/Whites/etc.)

My two pieces of advice: 1) Don't be cheap- you're feet are often your paycheck (Also, don't be the "sore-feet whiney-guy"). 2) Get local knowlage- ask they sr. ff's or cl's from your zone/district/area, often they have made the mistakes and/or have had the stupid sweat out of them already.

Sorry I couldn't be of too much more help, but without some details it's like asking what jacket to wear this winter without knowing if you're in Victoria or Churchill.

PS. From my experience, skip Gore-tex. If you're getting wet feet, as often as not it's coming over the top of your boot. The waterproof membranes often come apart with the conditions we work in and also make them hard to dry once wet. Good 'ol leather and some beeswax boot grease is the way to go.

dross60
Posts: 10
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:33 pm

Postby dross60 » Thu Oct 09, 2014 8:55 pm

[quote=""bcFRST""]Heya,


A logger-style lug-sole (ie, the "Smokejumper" model in pretty much any brand) is going to be the best for durability and will hold up on hot ground. That being said, a light low-heel hiker/hunter might be better if you're in shield country or the skeg.

[/quote]

What's the purpose of the high heel then? Sounds like its supposed to help you on steep terrain or something?

bcFRST
Posts: 33
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:33 pm

Postby bcFRST » Sun Oct 12, 2014 1:27 am

It`s more about foot fatigue. To illustrate, lift your bare foot off the ground (or cross your leg over your knee while sitting, or relax your leg fully suspended in water... whatever). Your toe will naturally drop. Besides gravity, it`s the physiological position of comfort for the foot and ankle. The raised heel manipulates the shank of the boot so you have that rise, thereby putting less stress on the foot and limiting the fatigue of your hoof. Nurses had this figured out back in Florence`s days (`dem clogs!) and many other industries where you`re on your feet and moving all day have developed similar shoe-types.

Most all footwear have a similar concept (many examples of this not being the case ie, min shoes, flip-flops, loafers, etc. but that`s not really the point). In running shoes it is called the `drop`, but it all basically does the same thing. An added piece regarding the heel is the lessening of impact with heel-strike, although this is secondary and is more related to the sole type.

Most all boots have this to one degree or another, usually you just don`t see it with flatter soled boots as it`s covered (but if you put your hand on the sole and the other on the heel you`ll feel it). Carfull if you get a logger- you`ll be taking a few headers at first until you get used to them, that heel catches! Oh, and a chunky lug with a big heel lets you hang out on hot ground when other`s are having to go find a cool place to stand.

I`m just a dumb firefighter though, go ask a good boot store, they`re the experts.

dross60
Posts: 10
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:33 pm

Postby dross60 » Thu Oct 16, 2014 7:51 pm

Well I might give them a try then next year!

ranger901
Posts: 4
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:33 pm

Postby ranger901 » Thu Jan 22, 2015 11:26 am

[quote=""dross60""]What do you guys recommend for boots? I see lots of guys with those expensive boots from Viberg, White's, Wesco... but they are so bulky and heavy! Any other recommendations?? There's gotta be some fireboots out there that don't have that ridiculous 1.5" vibram heel like on the ones I mentioned. Also with an all leather lining no goretex.[/quote]

By far the most popular boots in Ontario for fire rangers are royer ballistic nylon 8"

My last pair lasted me 4 seasons, make sure its this style though theres 2 types.

http://www.royer.com/Products/Boots-8/6/35/details.aspx

Cheers.

MFTPC
Posts: 4
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:33 pm

Postby MFTPC » Tue Feb 24, 2015 9:24 am

I work up in northern alberta and mostly in Skeg territory, but I also worked in Ontario swamps. I would say get the gore tex, no so much to keep your feet dry, but mostly to dry your boots out faster. Plain old leather takes forever to dry. I have some red wing gore tex leather boots and they have half the drying time of plain ol Dakotas.

But I would say if your in the Skeg everyday get a pair of Dunlops. Yeah you might get " Don't be a pussy rook. your going to get your feet wet anyways"... which might be true , but if you have rubbers and don't breach on 50% of your fires well your the one laughing at your leader on that 50%. Those new black ones with the Vibram soles kick ass. If you are going to go rubber get the Bama booties.

Also I'm going to say get some nice insoles as well. I rock some superfeet in my boots, and it's worth all the money in the world.

One final thing....Marino wool socks. Stay warm when wet, have the best drying properties, and will save you from blisters compared to cotton. You should get more then 60% Marino wool and can get them for cheep at Costco.

creamcheese
Posts: 34
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:33 pm

Postby creamcheese » Sat Apr 18, 2015 2:26 pm

[quote=""MFTPC""]I work up in northern alberta and mostly in Skeg territory, but I also worked in Ontario swamps. I would say get the gore tex, no so much to keep your feet dry, but mostly to dry your boots out faster. Plain old leather takes forever to dry. I have some red wing gore tex leather boots and they have half the drying time of plain ol Dakotas.

But I would say if your in the Skeg everyday get a pair of Dunlops. Yeah you might get " Don't be a pussy rook. your going to get your feet wet anyways"... which might be true , but if you have rubbers and don't breach on 50% of your fires well your the one laughing at your leader on that 50%. Those new black ones with the Vibram soles kick ass. If you are going to go rubber get the Bama booties.

Also I'm going to say get some nice insoles as well. I rock some superfeet in my boots, and it's worth all the money in the world.

One final thing....Marino wool socks. Stay warm when wet, have the best drying properties, and will save you from blisters compared to cotton. You should get more then 60% Marino wool and can get them for cheep at Costco.[/quote]

I find that goretex stays wet longer when water gets over your boot. Unless you have a peet dryer it's not gonna dry anytime soon. Also makes your foot sweat more.


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